Grandpa Visited His Friends At The Nursing Home Every Saturday – Until One Day







Every Saturday, Grandpa and I walked to the nursing home a few blocks away from our house.

Mom didn’t like it because I would skip playing with my friends so I could be with Grandpa even on a Saturday. We went to visit many of the old and sick people who lived there because they couldn’t take care of themselves anymore.

“Whoever visits the sick gives them life,” Grandpa always said.

First we visited Mrs. Sokol. I called her “The Cook.” She liked to talk about the time when she was a well-known cook back in Russia. People would come from miles around, just to taste her famous chicken soup.

Next we visited Mr. Meyer. I called him “The Joke Man.” We sat around his coffee table, and he told us jokes. Some were very funny. Some weren’t. And some I didn’t get. He laughed at his own jokes, shaking up and down and turning red in the face. Grandpa and I couldn’t help but laugh along with him, even when the jokes weren’t very funny.

Next door was Mr. Lipman. I called him “The Singer” because he loved to sing for us. Whenever he did, his beautiful voice filled the air, clear and strong and so full of energy that we always sang along with him.

We visited Mrs. Kagan, “The Grandmother,” who showed us pictures of her grandchildren. They were all over the room, in frames, in albums and even taped to the walls.

Mrs. Schrieber’s room was filled with memories, memories that came alive as she told us stories of her own experiences during the old days. I called her “The Memory Lady.”

Then there was Mr. Krull, “The Quiet Man.” He didn’t have very much to say; he just listened when Grandpa or I talked to him. He nodded and smiled, and told us to come again next week. That’s what everyone said to Grandpa and me, even the woman in charge, behind the desk.

Every week we did come again, even in the rain. We walked together to visit our friends: The Cook, The Joke Man, The Singer, The Grandmother, The Memory Lady and The Quiet Man.

One day Grandpa got very sick and had to go to the hospital. The doctors said they didn’t think he would ever get better.

Saturday came, and it was time to visit the nursing home. How could I go visiting without Grandpa? Then I remembered what he once told me: “Nothing should stand in the way of doing a good deed.” So I went alone. Whoever visits the sick gives them life.

Everyone was happy to see me. They were surprised when they didn’t see Grandpa. When I told them that he was sick and in the hospital, they could tell I was sad.

The Cook went on to reveal some of her secret ingredients. The Joke Man told me his latest jokes. The Singer sang a song especially for me. The Grandmother showed me more pictures. The Memory Lady shared more of her memories. When I visited The Quiet Man, I asked him lots of questions. When I ran out of questions, I talked about what I had learned in school.

After a while, I said goodbye to everyone, even the woman in charge, behind the desk.

“Thank you for coming,” she said. “May your grandfather have a complete recovery.”

A few days later, Grandpa was still in the hospital. He was not eating, he could not sit up and he could barely speak. I went to the corner of the room so Grandpa wouldn’t see me cry. My mother took my place by the bed and held Grandpa’s hand. The room was dim and very quiet.

Suddenly the nurse came into the room and said, “You have some visitors.”

“Is this the place with the party?” I heard a familiar voice ask.

I looked up. It was The Joke Man. Behind him were The Cook, The Singer, The Grandmother, The Memory Lady, The Quiet Man and even the woman in charge, behind the desk.

The Cook told Grandpa about all the great food that she would cook for him once he got well. She had even brought him a hot bowl of homemade chicken soup.

“Chicken soup? What this man needs is a pastrami sandwich,” said The Joke Man as he let out one of his deep, rich laughs.

Everyone laughed with him. Then he told us some new jokes. By the time he was finished, everyone had to use tissues to dry their eyes from laughing so hard.

Next, The Grandmother showed Grandpa a get-well card made by two of her granddaughters. On the front of one card was a picture of a clown holding balloons. “Get well soon!” was scribbled in crayon on the inside.

The Singer started singing, and we all sang along with him. The Memory Lady told us how Grandpa once came to visit her in a snowstorm, just to bring her some roses for her birthday.

Before I knew it, visiting hours were up. Everyone said a short prayer for Grandpa. Then they said goodbye and told him that they would see him again soon.

That evening, Grandpa called the nurse in and said he was hungry. Soon he began to sit up. Finally he was able to get out of bed. Each day, Grandpa felt better and better, and he grew stronger and stronger. Soon he was able to go home.

The doctors were shocked. They said his recovery was a medical miracle. But I knew the truth: His friends’ visit had made him well. Whoever visits the sick gives them life.

Grandpa is better now. Every Saturday, without fail, we walk together to visit our friends: The Cook, The Joke Man, The Singer, The Grandmother, The Memory Lady, The Quiet Man … and the woman in charge, behind the desk.

So sweet! SHARE if that brought a tear to your eye!

Mesothelioma Cancer
Mesothelioma is a rare, aggressive form of cancer that develops in the lining of the lungs, abdomen, or heart. Caused by asbestos, mesothelioma has no known cure and has a very poor prognosis.

According to a 2017 report by the Centers for Disease Control, 2,400 – 2,800 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma in the United States each year. People who have worked with or been exposed to asbestos have the highest risk of developing mesothelioma. After being exposed to asbestos, mesothelioma symptoms can take 20 – 50 years to appear.

The life expectancy for mesothelioma patients is poor, as there is no cure for the disease. The stage of the disease, cell type, and location of the tumor(s) are the most important factors for a patient’s survival. Factors such as the patient’s overall health, age, and whether the cancer has spread also impact prognosis.

After receiving a mesothelioma diagnosis, there are a number of vital decisions that must be made. The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance is dedicated to providing patients with the best resources available on current treatment, stories of survival and hope, and financial assistance.
Types of Mesothelioma
Mesothelioma is most commonly classified by the location in the body where it develops. Specifically, the cancer forms in the lining of certain organs or spaces within the body, known as the mesothelium. Mesothelioma typically develops in one of three specific areas.
Diagnosing Mesothelioma Symptoms
Mesothelioma symptoms can take 20 – 50 years to appear after the first exposure to asbestos. The signs of mesothelioma often look like those of other diseases, which can lead to misdiagnosis. When someone exhibits mesothelioma symptoms, doctors perform a variety of tests to rule out other diseases. It normally takes weeks or months for doctors to arrive at an accurate mesothelioma diagnosis.
Upon diagnosis, the doctor will categorize the disease into one of four stages. While there are several staging systems, the TNM System — which stands for tumor, lymph nodes, and metastasis — is the most commonly used.
Mesothelioma Cancer
Mesothelioma is a rare, aggressive form of cancer that develops in the lining of the lungs, abdomen, or heart. Caused by asbestos, mesothelioma has no known cure and has a very poor prognosis.

According to a 2017 report by the Centers for Disease Control, 2,400 – 2,800 people are diagnosed with mesothelioma in the United States each year. People who have worked with or been exposed to asbestos have the highest risk of developing mesothelioma. After being exposed to asbestos, mesothelioma symptoms can take 20 – 50 years to appear.

The life expectancy for mesothelioma patients is poor, as there is no cure for the disease. The stage of the disease, cell type, and location of the tumor(s) are the most important factors for a patient’s survival. Factors such as the patient’s overall health, age, and whether the cancer has spread also impact prognosis.

After receiving a mesothelioma diagnosis, there are a number of vital decisions that must be made. The Mesothelioma Cancer Alliance is dedicated to providing patients with the best resources available on current treatment, stories of survival and hope, and financial assistance.

Mesothelioma Survivorship and Life Expectancy
Prognosis
Prognosis
How a disease will progress. A prognosis can be good or bad, and may include a life expectancy estimate.
MORE Life Expectancy
Life Expectancy
How long a patient can expect to survive. This may change with treatment and other developments.
MORE Survival Rate
Survival Rate
A statistic (percentage or ratio) indicating how many people live a certain amount of time after diagnosis.
MORE
HELP IMPROVE YOUR PROGNOSIS. LEARN MORE.
Heather Von St. James – Mesothelioma Survivor
Watch Heather’s Story
Heather Von St. James is a 12-year pleural mesothelioma survivor who has become a spokeswoman for mesothelioma awareness and a proponent of banning asbestos.

She also works with newly diagnosed mesothelioma patients as a mentor and advocate, helping them understand their treatment and legal options.

Heather offers valuable insights into her successful treatment approach with Dr. David Sugarbaker. She has a unique perspective on life after surviving a mesothelioma diagnosis and enjoys sharing her story. Click here to connect with Heather.

Resources for Mesothelioma Patients and Their Families
Request a Free Mesothelioma Treatment Guide
Connect with Top Mesothelioma Doctors
Locate the Nearest Comprehensive Cancer Center
Sign up for Our Mesothelioma Treatment Alert
Speak with a 12-Year Mesothelioma Survivor
Financial Assistance Available to Help with Treatment Costs
Types of Mesothelioma
Mesothelioma is most commonly classified by the location in the body where it develops. Specifically, the cancer forms in the lining of certain organs or spaces within the body, known as the mesothelium. Mesothelioma typically develops in one of three specific areas.

Pleural Mesothelioma
LUNGS
The most common type, pleural mesothelioma is caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibers.

MORE
Peritoneal Mesothelioma
ABDOMEN
Inhaled or swallowed asbestos fibers can become trapped in the lining of the abdomen (the peritoneum).

MORE
Pericardial Mesothelioma
HEART
In rare cases, asbestos fibers can get lodged in the pericardium, the lining around the heart cavity.

MORE
Diagnosing Mesothelioma Symptoms
Mesothelioma symptoms can take 20 – 50 years to appear after the first exposure to asbestos. The signs of mesothelioma often look like those of other diseases, which can lead to misdiagnosis. When someone exhibits mesothelioma symptoms, doctors perform a variety of tests to rule out other diseases. It normally takes weeks or months for doctors to arrive at an accurate mesothelioma diagnosis.

Common Symptoms of Mesothelioma
Trouble breathing or chest pain.
Effusion (fluid buildup) in the lungs or abdomen.
Anemia (especially in women).
Nausea / vomiting.
Loss of weight.
Upon diagnosis, the doctor will categorize the disease into one of four stages. While there are several staging systems, the TNM System — which stands for tumor, lymph nodes, and metastasis — is the most commonly used.

Four Stages of Mesothelioma
STAGE
1
The mesothelioma tumor is located in only one area and has not spread to other parts of the body.

STAGE
2
A large tumor may have progressed to nearby areas and/or the lymph nodes, but has not gone on any further.

STAGE
3
Tumors have typically spread beyond the local area to several nearby locations and the lymph nodes.

STAGE
4
The tumors have spread into multiple areas and throughout the lymphatic system, invading other organs throughout the body.

Typically, Stage 1 and Stage 2 mesothelioma can be treated effectively with surgery and other forms of therapy. However, Stage 3 and Stage 4 mesothelioma are often treated palliatively.

FREE 2018 MESOTHELIOMA GUIDE AND BOOKS
Treating Mesothelioma
Treatment for mesothelioma is similar to other types of cancer. The most common treatments are surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Newer treatments are being studied as part of clinical trials and may be available for some patients who do not respond to conventional therapies.

In some cases, treatment can improve a patient’s prognosis, extending his/her life significantly. Treatment can also be used palliatively to reduce pain and discomfort caused by the symptoms of mesothelioma.

Mesothelioma Doctors
Mesothelioma Doctors
Finding a mesothelioma doctor and creating a custom treatment plan based on your diagnosis is the most important decision you can make to improve prognosis. Browse our catalog of top mesothelioma doctors around the country.

Mesothelioma Cancer Centers
Mesothelioma Cancer Clinics
Mesothelioma clinics and cancer centers offer patients a way to get the most comprehensive care, using the latest technology and techniques available. Locate the best mesothelioma clinics near you.



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